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Symbols of protection against evil found on Egyptian mummy

Intricate animal and flower tattoos adorn the mummy’s neck, shoulders and back.

The mummy's tattoos include two seated baboons depicted between a wadjet eye (top row), a symbol of protection.

The mummy’s tattoos include two seated baboons depicted between a wadjet eye (top row), a symbol of protection.

A mummy from ancient Egypt was heavily tattooed with sacred symbols, which may have served to advertise and enhance the religious powers of the woman who received them more than 3,000 years ago. Continue reading

Hobbits Died Out 50,000 Years Ago

Findings published in Nature reveal Hobbits may have lived along side modern humans.hobbits-skull-archaeform-web

Eight years of further excavations and study at the Indonesian cave site of Liang Bua have pushed back the time of disappearance of the ‘hobbits’ of Flores (Homo floresiensis) from as recently as 12,000 years ago to about 50,000 years ago, according to new findings published today (31 March, AEDT) in Nature. Continue reading

Detective Scientists Discover Ancient Clues in Mummy Portraits

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Northwestern is a leader in using scientific analysis to study cultural heritage materials

EVANSTON, Ill. — A Northwestern University research team has taken CSI to a whole new level: employing sophisticated scientific tools to investigate details of the materials and methods used by Roman-Egyptian artists to paint lifelike mummy portraits more than 2,000 years ago. These visages of the dead are considered to be antecedents of Western portraiture. Continue reading

9.200 years old preserved fish found

Signs of early settlement in the Nordic region date back to the cradle of civilisation

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The discovery of the world’s oldest storage of fermented fish in southern Sweden could rewrite the Nordic prehistory with findings indicating a far more complex society than previously thought. The unique discovery by osteologist Adam Boethius from Lund University was made when excavating a 9,200 year-old settlement at what was once a lake in Blekinge, Sweden.

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World’s oldest customer complaint translated

Is this the world’s oldest customer complaint? 3,750-year-old Babylonian tablet details how a person called ‘Nanni’ was not happy with a delivery of ancient copper ore

An intricate tablet (pictured), thought to be the world's oldest complaint 'letter' was written by a disappointed customer from ancient Babylonia. The story goes that a merchant named Ea-nasir journeyed to the Persian Gulf to buy copper to sell in Mesopotamia. This included ingots for Nanni, who sent his servant to pay for them.

An intricate tablet (pictured), thought to be the world’s oldest complaint ‘letter’ was written by a disappointed customer from ancient Babylonia. The story goes that a merchant named Ea-nasir journeyed to the Persian Gulf to buy copper to sell in Mesopotamia. This included ingots for Nanni, who sent his servant to pay for them.

If you have ever composed a shirty email complaining about damaged goods, a mixed-up order or late delivery, you certainly weren’t the first.

An intricate tablet, thought to be the world’s oldest complaint ‘letter’ was written by a disappointed customer from ancient Babylonia, 3,766 years ago.

In it, ‘Nanni’ complains to a merchant about receiving the wrong grade of copper ore that’s arrived late and is slightly damaged.
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Beauty in antiquity: MESOLITHIC PENDANT DISCOVERED

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11,000 year old pendant is earliest known Mesolithic art in Britain

 

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YORK, ENGLAND—An 11,000-year-old pendant has been discovered in lake-edge deposits at the Early Mesolithic site at Star Carr in North Yorkshire. It is triangular in shape, was carved from a single piece of shale, has a hole in one corner, and is engraved with a series of lines that scholars think could represent a tree, a map, a leaf, or tally marks. At first, the artifact was thought to be a natural stone, since the perforation was blocked by sediment. “It is unlike anything we have found in Britain from this period. We can only imagine who owned it, how they wore it, and what the engravings actually meant to them,” Nicky Milner of the University of York said in a press release. Shale beads, a piece of perforated amber, and two perforated animal teeth have also been recovered from the site. “The designs on our pendant are similar to those found in southern Scandinavia and other areas bordering the North Sea, showing a close cultural connection between northern European groups at this time,” added Chantal Conneller of the University of Manchester. Continue reading